Tag Archives: Spinal fusion surgery

How Soon Can I Get Out of Bed After Spinal Fusion Surgery?

Posted: Tuesday, June 11th, 2013 | Filed under: lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Bed Ridden After Surgery

Getting Out of Bed After Surgery

In recent blogs we’ve addressed preparations for back surgery – specifically surgery for spinal stenosis, and spinal fusion operations. Yet the recovery process is just as important as the back surgery itself to your long-term health, so it’s important prepare for postoperative routines and realities well before the surgery is performed.

Among the first questions patients often ask about the spinal fusion back surgery recovery process is how soon they will be able to get out of bed following the operation. Patients typically get out of bed the day after their surgery – with the help of attendants, who will assist you in sitting up, getting your legs over the side of the bed, standing up and walking. You’ll be glad you spent time getting in shape before your operation. The preparation pays off at times like this, as being in good health will help throughout your healing and recovery, as the body responds to the trauma of surgery and works to repair itself. Read More »

Preparing for Spinal Fusion Surgery, Part II

Posted: Tuesday, May 28th, 2013 | Filed under: lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Back Surgery

Doctors Completing Surgery

In our last blog we began addressing the topic of preparing for spinal fusion back surgery.  We touched upon tests that may be performed, and the need to prepare physically through a conditioning regimen so your body is ready for the rigors of surgery. Here are additional points anyone considering spinal fusion should remember:

One potential complication of spinal fusion surgery is excessive bleeding. Several commonly used medications can increase bleeding, including aspirin, ibuprofen and other NSAIDs, as can anticoagulants such as warfarin. You will need to discontinue use of any such medications. Should your physician or surgeon be concerned about the risk of excessive blood loss during your spinal fusion operation, you may bank your own blood, called an autologous blood donation, before the surgery. Read More »

Spinal Surgery for a Slipped Disc

Posted: Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Spinal Surgery for a Slipped Disc

Spinal Surgery Scar

A slipped disc is a common term for a herniated disc, which occurs when the central core of a spinal disc ruptures. Fluid from within the disc then leaks into the spinal canal, where it can interfere with the functioning of nerves. A slipped disc in the spine is the last stage in a degenerative disc disease process that begins with a bulging disc and progresses to a protruding disc, before it finally ruptures. The “slipped disc” has not actually shifted position. Symptoms of slipped disc vary depending on the location of the slipped disc in the spine, and the extent of the rupturing. A slipped disc may be entirely unnoticeable if it doesn’t result in pressure on a nerve. A slipped disc in the neck (a slipped cervical disc), may cause pain or numbness in the shoulders, arms or chest. A slipped disc in the lower back (a slipped lumbar disc) may cause sciatica, creating pain anywhere from the buttocks to the feet. Read More »

Causes of Back Pain in Women

Posted: Wednesday, September 26th, 2012 | Filed under: Back health, Lumbar pain, Spine conditions, womens health | author: By admin
Back Pain in Women

Back Pain in Women

Back pain is a universal and non-discriminatory malady, and the problems that cause back pain in women are often the same as in men. That said, some causes of back pain – menstruation, pregnancy, and osteoporosis, for example – are either unique or more prevalent among women. Menstruation often causes back pain, and cramps associated with menstruation put additional stress on back muscles. Pregnancy also often causes back pain, particularly in its latter stages. The added weight of carrying the fetus puts significant stress on the spine and supporting muscles and ligaments. While being overweight for any reason can cause back pain, the rapid weight gain of pregnancy compounds the problem. Moreover, mental stress is known to cause or contribute to back pain, in part by the concomitant involuntary tightening of muscles in the back. Pregnancy, as with any major life change, is a time of great psychological stress. Later in life, the bone building process in our bodies loses its balance and calcium is depleted from our bones. The more brittle bone is prone to breakage. This phenomena of osteoporosis is more common among women than men. Read More »

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