Tag Archives: spinal conditions

Common Questions About Back Pain: What are the Different Types of Back Surgery

Posted: Thursday, August 22nd, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Lumbar pain, mens health, Spinal Surgery, Spine Surgery | author: By admin

Back Surgery Can Potentially Cure Your Pain

There are several different types of back surgery proving successful at resolving patients’ back pain issues, each involving the highest level of surgical technology available today, as well as the skill of a board-certified spinal surgeon. If your spinal specialist advises back surgery, you’ll embark upon a learning process about the different available back surgery procedures – guided by your physician. You always want to get your information directly from your spinal surgeon, since back surgery information online can be outdated or incorrect, and Googling back surgery topics can sometimes cause unnecessary anxiety.   The best course of action for researching back surgery procedures is to prepare a list of questions for your surgeon, and request all of the back surgery literature possible that your doctor can provide you with so that you can fully understand what will be done during your surgical procedure. Read More »

Common Questions About Back Pain: Do You Need Back Surgery?

Posted: Friday, August 16th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, mens health, Spine Surgery | author: By admin

Is Your Back Pain Something More Serious?

If you’re experiencing ongoing or severe back pain, you’re likely wondering if you’ll need back surgery to finally rid yourself of that constant back ache or debilitating back pain. The answer will come once your spinal surgeon assesses your back pain or back injury symptoms, and takes a full medical history, to review your general health level and medical issues.  But before you panic, keep in mind that back surgery is generally needed only in a small percentage of back pain cases. Most back pain can be resolved by a range of non-surgical options that can keep you off the operating table and have you feeling better soon.  Some of these are as the application of ice or heat, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and massage.  Changing your diet with the goal of losing weight can also help take pressure off the nerves in your back and once the initial discomfort is lessened, exercise can also provide non-surgical relief. Read More »

Caring for Your Spinal Incision

Posted: Saturday, March 16th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
spinal incision

spinal incision

Proper care for the surgical incision is one of the most important aspects of post-operative home recuperation following back surgery. The surgical incision may be closed with dissolvable sutures and steri-strips, staples, or sutures. Staples or visible sutures should be removed 14 days following the spinal surgery. You won’t be permitted to apply any ointments or lotions to the incision while it is healing. You should not bathe in a tub, swim, or use a hot tub until your incision is healed, either. Read More »

What is Neural Claudication?

Posted: Tuesday, March 12th, 2013 | Filed under: Back health, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Neurologic claudication

Neurologic Claudication

Recently we addressed the topic of claudication, pain typically felt in the legs as a result of vascular, or blood vessel problems, or back problems such as spinal stenosis that can result in pinched nerves in the lower back. Neurogenic claudication is a common symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis, an abnormal narrowing of the spinal canal in the lumbar, or lower portion of the spine. Neurogenic refers to the problem’s genesis in the nerves, and claudication, Latin for limp, refers to the painful weakness or cramping the patient feels in his or her legs. Neurogenic claudication can be bilateral (in both legs) or unilateral (in one leg).  The pain may be triggered by walking or prolonged standing, and is typically alleviated by changing position or flexion of the waist, not simply by resting, as happens with vascular claudication.  In severe cases, the pain may be persistent. Bone spurs, bulging discs and herniated discs can also cause neurogenic claudication. Read More »

Choosing a Spinal Surgeon

Posted: Wednesday, December 26th, 2012 | Filed under: Back health, lumbar spinal stenosis, Spinal Stenosis, Spinal Surgery, Spine conditions, Spine Surgery | author: By admin
Spine Surgeon

Surgeon

Choosing a spinal surgeon is among the most important medical decisions a patient can make. A spinal surgeon does more than perform an operation. A spinal surgeon consults with you, explains options and answers questions, and plans your treatment and recovery. You need to trust your spine surgeon, and to feel free to discuss all medical matters frankly.

You should choose a spinal surgeon who is board certified or board eligible, and trained in a fellowship program. If possible, choose a surgeon who specializes in the area of the spine that requires treatment– for example, a lumbar spinal surgery specialist if your problem is in the lower back. Alternatively, choose a spine surgeon who specializes in treating the specific condition affecting you, such as spondylolisthesis or spinal cord injuries. Read More »

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